In the News

Dropbox Drops Users' Rights Through Forced Arbitration

Did you get the late-night email from Dropbox about their updates? (Here’s the blog post in case you missed it.) If you are wondering what the innocuous language about "adding an arbitration section" really means, it's simple: it means if Dropbox lets your data slip into the wrong hands, you are out of luck and they can't be held accountable. 

CVS To Halt Cigarette Sales

Three cheers for CVS!

On Wednesday, the drugstore made the decision to take cigarettes off the shelves of its 7,600 stores. 

According to reports, CVS is the first national chain to eliminate tobacco products in what could be a precedent-setting move if other stores make a similar decision to follow suit. 

Sales are projected to end by Oct. 1. 

AAJ President Shares Influential Asbestos Story

Asbestos is the quintessential example of corporations knowing that they are marketing deadly products and covering up the evidence for profit.  In many cases, asbestos manufacturers are fully aware that their workers were dying at alarming rates, yet they hide the dangers.

Patient Safety Should Be No. 1 Concern

If 20 jetliners began crashing weekly, said a safety expert recently, "There would be a national ground stop. Fleets would be grounded. Airports would close. There would be a presidential commission. The NTSB would investigate. No one would fly until we had solved the problems." You're probably now thinking, "What kind of crazy hypothetical is that?"

Video: Donohue, U.S. Chamber Continue Lawsuit Hypocrisy

On Wednesday, Jan. 8, U.S. Chamber of Commerce President & CEO Tom Donohue continued his blatant lawsuit hypocrisy at the U.S. Chamber’s annual State of American Business address. 

Watch and listen to Donohue in his own words claim that the courtroom should be open for the U.S. Chamber but for not consumers.  We call that “Do as I Say, Not as I Sue” 

Forced Arbitration Eliminates Justice for Atlanta Homeowner

Greg Cole owns a house outside Atlanta valued at almost half a million dollars - but according to Greg, he cannot even sleep in it. He believes construction problems caused cracks, which led to leaks and mold. The mold became so bad he and his family had to move out after becoming sick from the mold.

When Greg went to seek justice he found another hidden danger – a forced arbitration clause buried in the fine print of his contract with his homebuilder. According to CBS of Atlanta, this meant that he could not take his case to court, but instead was forced to go before an arbitration panel that was handpicked by the homebuilder.

As CBS of Atlanta reported, all consumers are at risk because forced arbitration clauses, like the one that was used against Greg, grant corporations a license to steal and violate the law. See video here

Video: AAJ President Discusses Generic Drugs

Nearly 80 percent of all prescriptions in the U.S. are filled with the generic version of a drug.  The price tag can be appealing, but taking a generic drug can also have dangerous consequences because generic drug manufacturers are not accountable for the safety of drugs they produce.

Accountability is a key incentive to ensure drug companies monitor and adequately warn patients about the safety of drugs. Despite what many may think, the FDA does not test drugs, but instead relies on testing provided by the drug companies.  FDA approval of a drug does not guarantee safety.  

In the above video, American Association for Justice President Burton LeBlanc talks about the accountability imbalance between generic drugs and name-brand drugs and how the lack of accountability can put consumers at risk. 

NY Times Pens Editorial on Forced Arbitration

Forced arbitration creates a system rigged against individual consumers and tipped in favor of billion dollar corporations. Hidden in the fine print of many business contracts are clauses that give corporations and unfair advantage over consumers. Those clauses eliminate the rights of consumers to take a case to court when a problem arises and allow corporations to evade accountability.

Congress Must Revoke Corporations’ License to Steal

The U.S. Senate Judiciary Committee held a hearing yesterday on an important issue that affects all Americans.  It is called forced arbitration.

Buried in the fine print of many contracts – from credit card and nursing home contracts to employee handbooks and online user agreements – are dangerous forced arbitration clauses that eliminate access to justice and allow corporations to evade accountability. 

Forced arbitration grants corporations a license to steal and violate the law. 

U.S. Chamber of Commerce’s Memo on Forced Arbitration Intentionally Biased & Factually Inaccurate

When corporations commit widespread fraud and violate state and federal laws, consumers need an avenue to hold them accountable.  Consumers’ ability to join together is often the only way to hold those corporations responsible.  Forced arbitration clauses that ban class actions prohibit consumers from bringing claims, period.  It is too costly for consumers to bring claims on an individual basis in any forum—arbitration or court.  Forced arbitration grants corporations a license to steal and violate the law.    

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