In the News

Vulnerable Nursing Home Patients Need Ability to Sue in Court as Government Agencies Fail to Protect Them

This post was originally published on Public Justice’s blog and can be found here.

By Leslie Bailey, Staff Attorney, Public Justice 

According to a new report just released by the Center for Investigative Reporting and reported by KQED, the failure of California regulators to adequately investigate and pursue claims of abuse and misconduct by nursing assistants and health aids is “putting the elderly, sick, and disabled at risk.” In fact, the regulators that are charged with protecting vulnerable patients in nursing homes and assisted living facilities are either conducting “cursory and indifferent” investigations, or simply closing cases without taking any action at all. The report underscores how critically important it is for people to have the ability to sue when loved ones are harmed by nursing home neglect—or worse.

BP Up To Its Old Tricks: Backpedaling & Blaming Victims

Two weeks ago we told you how BP is actually trying to paint themselves as the real victim of their massive oil spill. They underestimated the damage they inflicted on the Gulf, and now they're trying to backpedal out of the oil spill settlement agreement their own corporate lawyers wrote.  

The attacks have continued. BP is blaming the Judge, claims administrator, accountants and lawyers. Worse, BP is blaming the people and businesses of the Gulf. According to BP, the innocent party is BP itself.  

USA Today Piece Highlights Medical Errors

When you go to the hospital, they have your medical records - but does it work in reverse? Do you have your hospital’s safety records? Today’s front page article in USA Today highlights a very scary and real health crisis: 

Accountability for Illegal Asbestos Dumping, but not for Corporations?

Last week, a former construction supervisor was sentenced to six months in jail for not properly handling pipe coated with asbestos during a sewer and water system upgrade in Idaho.

NYT Columnist Smears "Plaintiffs' Lawyers" Because Of Deepwater Horizon Litigation

This post was originally published on Media Matters for America’s blog and can be found here.

Columnist Joe Nocera of The New York Times made a sweeping negative generalization about "mass tort" lawsuits and "plaintiffs' lawyers" because BP is currently paying out more in damages than it expected for the Deepwater Horizon disaster.

BP pled guilty to the felony manslaughter of 11 workers who perished when the Deepwater Horizon oil rig exploded in April 2010. In addition, BP pled guilty to lying to Congress about the extent of the resulting environmental catastrophe and agreed to a $4 billion plea agreement - a record sum in criminal penalties. BP also settled in civil proceedings for damage beyond the immediate blowout, such as the extensive economic and medical harm caused to those who depend on a Gulf of Mexico unpolluted by millions of barrels of oil.

Just when you think you have seen it all

The following is a guest post on BP's backpedaling from Joe Rice, co-founding member of Motley Rice.

In the course of 30 years of practicing law I have never seen a corporate defendant backpedal on an agreed-to settlement to the extent BP is attempting to do in the Deepwater Horizon Economic and Property Damages Class Action Settlement. BP still doesn’t understand the law or the facts of this case.  

Locked out of the Courts: A Used Car Buyer's Plight

Catchy Billboard Attracting Public Attention to Used Car Buyer's Plight

Victim of forced arbitration's story on YouTube watched by over 550,000 viewers 

FDA Acts on Generic Drug Safety

After 23 months, the U.S Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has finally agreed to look at the huge safety discrepancy between generic and brand named drugs.  The FDA signaled the move by notifying the Office of Management and Budget of its plans to publish a proposed new rule that would make create similar requirements for generic and brand-name drug makers with respect to how they update their warning labels.

Members of Congress Call on FDA to Protect Generic Drugs

In response to Monday's Supreme Court decision in Mutual v. Bartlett, ruling that generic drug companies cannot be held responsible for the design of the drugs they make, members of Congress have sent a letter to the FDA urging for action to address the disparity between the safety requirements for brand and generic drugs.

Supreme Court Expands Immunity for Big Pharma

The U.S. Supreme Court gave pharmaceutical companies another gift today, largely shielding the generic industry from lawsuits for the design of their drugs.  This is the second Supreme Court decision giving the generic drug industry immunity.

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